Railroad: Copper Range Railroad Company

The Copper Range railroad ( COPR) was financed by the Copper Range Company, owner of numerous mines in Ontonagon, Houghton and later Keweenaw counties. The main line was built north from Mass City to Houghton in 1899 and a branch to its mills near Freda in 1901. The COPR was extended from Hancock north along the east shore of the peninsula to via Lake Linden to Calumet in 1903. COPR also had numerous branches to mines as well as powder facilities on the Senter Branch. In 1917, it leased the branch to Gay and its smelter on Keweenaw Bay. [MRL]

The line from Lake Linden to Calumet was abandoned in 1964 and the remainder of the operation abandoned in 1973. [MRL]


BuiltCopper Range Railroad → Abandoned


Built: 1899 from Houghton to Winona and in 1903 to McKeever.

Operated for 74 years.

Became: Abandoned in 1973.

Reference: [MRRC]


Copper Range Railroad Copper Range Caboose

Notes

The Copper Range railroad ( COPR) was built to serve the mines and mining locations of the south range, extending from Houghton to McKeever where they had a connection with the Milwaukee Road's line to Ontonagon. The railroad was principally owned by the Copper Range Company.

In later years, the COPR operated lines north of Hancock reaching mining locations along the shore of Portage and Torch lakes and into Calumet and Ahmeek.

During its 72 year history, the railroad owned 32 steam locomotives and 3 diesel engines. [MIS-2022-W]

Photo Info: Top,, a short COPR freight train stops for a photo on what is probably the Firesteel River. [Charles Geletzke Jr. collection]. 2nd photo, a COPR caboose, with a modified freight door, at Houghton yard. July, 1972. [Charles Geletzke Jr.]. Below, a Copper Range advertisement from 1909. [Mark Worrall collection]

The railroad's main yard was located on the south shore of Portage Lake just west of Houghton. The railroad had a large coal unloading facility near the yard, which was used to unload coal from lake freighters for delivery to hoist houses at their mines and smelters along Lake Superior.

As copper mining was discontinued in the mid-1900's, the railroad closed in 1973.


Time Line

1899. December 27. The line is completed from Greenland (on the MILW) 40.9 miles to Houghton (on the DSS&A). out of heavily timbered country and it was necessary to blast out stumps to clear the way for the graders. Track laying was begun Sept. 26 at the Houghton end of the line and five miles were completed that month. The rails, weighing 75 lbs. to the yard, were made by the Illinois Steel Co. at South Chicago. There was an average of 900 men and 300 teams at work all summer, and the last spike - appropriately made of copper - was driven December 26.

The contract of C. E. Loss & Co. included culverts and bridges with the exception of the bridge over the Fire Steel River, which is long, composed of three trestles each of 500 feet, and which cost $60,000. Of the other bridges, the largest, that at Cole's Creek Valley is 320 feet long and 85 feet high, and that [is] at the old Atlantic Stamp Mill 400 feet long and 75 feet high. It was intended to build these bridges of steel, cut the difficulty in getting material made it necessary to build them temporarily of timber.

The first passenger train was run on the road December 8 [1899] when service was opened from Houghton south 27 miles to Winona Mine, and with the completion of the road this service has now been extended over the entire line. The road is owned by the Copper Range Co., which controls the entire capital stock and $1 million of bonds of the road. It also owns outright 8,000 acres of land on the mineral range, and has under option 2,240 acres of land from the St. Mary's Canal Mineral Land Co. The road with its feeders, which are yet to be built, taps a very rich copper mining district. [RG-1900-0112] Standard gauge.

1901. January 6. A branch is built from Mill Mine Junction to Painesdale to reach the mining district there. Liners also extended to Baltic Mine, Freda, Redridge, Edgemere and Greenland. [MRL]

1901. The branch line from Mill Mine Junction to Freda along Lake Superior was constructed as part of the original Copper Range railroad. [MRL]

1902. SNAPSHOT. The road employs 172 people, including 2 train dispatchers, 11 station agents, 12 enginemen and firemen, 12 conductors,6 other trainmen, 54 section foremen and hands, 12 switchmen, 5 flagmen and watchmen, and 2 telegraph operators. The railroad crosses the Atlantic & Lake Superior at Atlantic and the Mineral Range railroad at Peppard. The road operated 13 locomotives, 9 8-wheel passenger cars, 2 express/baggage cars, 19 box freight cars, 100 platform cars, 128 ore cars 2 conductor way cars, and one steam shovel. All cars equipped with power brakes, Westinghouse and New York patterns. Passenger cars are headed with steam, Baker and Gold heaters. Top five categories of freight carried in tons:  copper rock (381,547 tons); coal (124,000 tons), forest products (46,000 tons), stone, sand (25,651 tons), and cement brick, lime (7,971 tons). The company used the United States Express Company, and the Western Union Telegraph Co. owned about 60 miles of telegraph line. [MCR-1903]

1902. October 6. Two trespassers were killed this year. "Engine No. 101 struck them before it could be stopped. Jug with whiskey found beside them. Jury exonerated railroad company". [MCR-1903]

1903. The main line is extended across Portage Lake and on to Calumet. [MRL]

1903. The COPR reports that it crosses the following railroads at grade: MR at Peppard; A&LS at Atlantic; MR on the Portage Lake bridge; H&C at Hancock (smelter); and the MR near Calumet. The COPR crosses over the Q&TL at Mason (3 different crossings); and under the MR Arcadian Branch at Montreal; under a spur of the Q&TL at Mason; under the H&C near Mills; under the H&TL at Lake Linden; and under the Houghton Street Railway near Calumet. [MCR-1904]

1904. March 19. The management of the Copper Range railroad have just ordered five new passenger coaches and two new combination cars for use on their line between the copper country  and the Marquette range towns during the coming summer. Many excursions are expected during the summer and the company wish to be prepared for this increase in their business. [BHN-1904-0319]

1904. June. The Copper Range railroad has placed an order with the American Car & Foundry Co. for 25 forty-ton ore cars. These will probably be built at the Detroit plant. The road has also ordered two new locomotives. [DFP-1904-0622]

1907 School Train. From 1907 to 1944, the Copper Range railroad operated a school train for the purpose of picking up and delivering students from the mining region to the Adams Township School in Painesdale. Most of the mines in the region south of Houghton were owned or operated by the Copper Range Company, the parent of the railroad and the road system between mining locations was inadequate especially given the snowfall during the winter months.

The train, with as many as six passenger cars, left the Houghton COPR yard heading south. At Atlantic Mine they dropped off a car for loading of students.

The train then headed around the wye at Mill Mine Jct. west to pick up students at Freda, which was had a Copper Range facility on Lake Superior. The train turned around at Beacon Hill, picking up students along the route at Redridge, Salmon Trout and other towns. Back at Atlantic Mine, the dripped off car was picked up (now full of students) and the train headed south to the school at Painsdale picking up students at Baltic, Trimountain and other locations.

In the afternoon, the trip was reversed and students were brought home. While school was in session, the locomotive crew switched the ore mines in the area and ore cars were often attached to the back of the train on the trip home. Copper Range Bus Co. busses began replacing the school train at some locations in 1941 and the service was discontinued in 1944. Stanton and Adams Townships reimbursed the railroad for the cost of the train and a coupon system was used by students when they road.

For a complete description of the train, see the September/October, 2020 edition of the Michigan History Magazine and the article by Jeremy W. Kilar on page 14. [MHM-10/2020]

1909. The line from McKeever to Mass City is removed. [MRL]

COPR-Advertisement1909MarkWorrallColl.jpg1910. July 19. Offices Move. The general offices of the Copper Range railroad in the Dee Building were this morning shifted from the rear to the front of the second floor of tht structure, taking possession of the suite recently vacated by Paine, Webber & Co. This suite of rooms occupies much of the front of the second floor of the building and has been entirely remodeled and redecorated for the railroad company. [ CN-1910-0719]

1910. October 3. Telephone replaces telegraph. The Copper Range railroad will substitute a telephone system for the former railroad ticker, and the Kellogg train dispatching system, which is being installed on that road, will be in operation by the first of next January (1911). This work of installing this system will require the reconstruction of the entire line, ad poles will be placed from the right to the left side of the tracks. The telephone, because of the great ease and facility of transmission, is rapidly supplanting the telegraph which has been considered the standard for handling train movements for a great many years.

There are several reasons why the telephone is better than the telegraph for railroad purposes, it is said. By the Kellogg system more privacy may be secured but at the same time, if necessary, all the agents on the road may be talked to at the same time. It is also necessary for a ticket agent to be an operator. Several trains on the Copper Range railroad will be supplied with telephones and in case a train should become stalled, connection with the line can easily be made by means of what is known as a fish-pole arrangement. [ CN-1910-1003]

1910. October 4. Copper Range rebuilding car shops. Work on the foundation of the new car shop to be built on the site of the one recently destroyed by fire, was begun yesterday by the Copper Range railroad company and will be rushed to completion. The foundation will e built by the railroad company and the contract for the remainder of the building will be let to a local contractor.

The new car shop, which will be a paint shop and carpenter shop combined, will be constructed of brick, steel and concrete, and is to be entirely fire proof. The dimensions of the paint shop are 24 by 147 feet, while the carpenter shop will be 36 by 105 feet. A steel frame will separate the two shops and a track will be run through each. The new buildings will be a big improvement over the old shops. The company will avoid another fire like the recent one, which entailed a loss of $4500 all of which, however, was covered by insurance. [ CN-1910-1004]

1912. January 30. Copper Range receives three cars which were rebuilt. The Copper Range railroad will place in commission Thursday between Calumet and Ontonagon, a train of new cars, or old ones which have been entirely rebuilt and which have just been received from the shops. The cars have been painted yellow, so as to conform with the color of the St. Paul cars. There is a new day coach, smoking car and a combination baggage and mail car. A feature of the new train is the Pintsch gas lighting system, by which a storage tank in each car will be filled with gas from storage tanks set up in the Calumet and Houghton yards. As soon as the new cars are placed in commission three others will be sent to the shops to be rebuilt. [CAN-1912-0130]

1913. November 19. Wires Cut by Strikers. The wires of the Copper Range railroad and the Western Union telegraph wires were cut at Ricedale and between Mill Mine Junction and South Range. In consequence, train service was delayed several hours. [DFP-1913-1119]

1913. The Painsdale branch is continued to a connection with the main line at Ricedale. This becomes the new main line and the old main line from Mill Mine Junction is removed. [MRL]

1913. November 21. Extension Ready December 1. Announcement was made today that the service over the new Painesdale extension will go into effect December 1. All tariffs and time cards have been changed to accord with the new route, beginning on that date. The extension is now completed, the track laid, and it could be used by trains under new construction conditions. But the prospect is for favorable ballasting weather up to December 1 and General Manager Bolles is giving Chief Engineer Batchelder that much leeway to order that the construction may be more nearly complete.

It is not unlikely that the ceremony of "driving the copper spike" to commemorate the most important construction undertaken by the road in several years, will be in a theory only. It is probable the weather conditions on December 1 will be unfavorable to such an outdoor demonstration of the Painesdale joy in being linked with the main line of the road. If the weather conditions permit there will be some such ceremony. [ CN-1913-11221]

1913. December 27. Union Leaders Put On Train. William Moyer, President of the Western Federation of Miners, and John Tanner, an organizer of the WFM were observed taking a street car from Hancock to Houghton, and then boarding a southbound Copper Range passenger train accompanied by three men who seemed to be guarding them. The train was bound for Chicago. Moyer's departure was unexpected and a Citizens Alliance professed ignorance of the incident and refused to discuss it. This was a turning point in a long strike by miners in the region which seemed to culminate in the Italian Hall Christmas party incident which killed 72 persons, mostly children. [HP -1913-1227]

1914. July 3. New Coal Dock. The Copper Range railroad is erecting on the dock of the Houghton County Electric Light company a coal trestle on concrete piers, which will be used in handling about two-thirds of the company's consumption of fuel. The remainder will be brought in by boat. It is expected the new trestle will be in operation in thirty days. [ CN-1914-0703]

1918. May 31. Women Hired. The Copper Range railroad in upper Michigan is hiring women station agents to take the places of men called to the colors (for the war effort). [LSF-1918-0531]

1928. The line from Freda to Freda Park is removed. [MRL]

1964. The branch from south of Lake Linden to Calumet is abandoned. [MRL]

1971. Mining Railway Being Removed. The rails of the Copper Range branch line between Mill Mine Junction and Freda, a milling town are being removed.  Freda once was the location of the Champion Copper Mill, which crushed all Champion Mine rock for more than half a century. The Copper Range Railroad is a subsidiary of the Copper Range Co., which owns the White Pine Mines in Ontonagon County. [Escanaba Daily News, September 4, 1971]

1973. The remainder of the line, from McKeever to Lake Linden is removed. [MRL]

 

 

 

Railroad: Copper Range Railroad Company

The Copper Range railroad ( COPR) was financed by the Copper Range Company, owner of numerous mines in Ontonagon, Houghton and later Keweenaw counties. The main line was built north from Mass City to Houghton in 1899 and a branch to its mills near Freda in 1901. The COPR was extended from Hancock north along the east shore of the peninsula to via Lake Linden to Calumet in 1903. COPR also had numerous branches to mines as well as powder facilities on the Senter Branch. In 1917, it leased the branch to Gay and its smelter on Keweenaw Bay. [MRL]

The line from Lake Linden to Calumet was abandoned in 1964 and the remainder of the operation abandoned in 1973. [MRL]


BuiltCopper Range Railroad → Abandoned


Built: 1899 from Houghton to Winona and in 1903 to McKeever.

Operated for 74 years.

Became: Abandoned in 1973.

Reference: [MRRC]


Copper Range Railroad Copper Range Caboose

Notes

The Copper Range railroad ( COPR) was built to serve the mines and mining locations of the south range, extending from Houghton to McKeever where they had a connection with the Milwaukee Road's line to Ontonagon. The railroad was principally owned by the Copper Range Company.

In later years, the COPR operated lines north of Hancock reaching mining locations along the shore of Portage and Torch lakes and into Calumet and Ahmeek.

During its 72 year history, the railroad owned 32 steam locomotives and 3 diesel engines. [MIS-2022-W]

Photo Info: Top,, a short COPR freight train stops for a photo on what is probably the Firesteel River. [Charles Geletzke Jr. collection]. 2nd photo, a COPR caboose, with a modified freight door, at Houghton yard. July, 1972. [Charles Geletzke Jr.]. Below, a Copper Range advertisement from 1909. [Mark Worrall collection]

The railroad's main yard was located on the south shore of Portage Lake just west of Houghton. The railroad had a large coal unloading facility near the yard, which was used to unload coal from lake freighters for delivery to hoist houses at their mines and smelters along Lake Superior.

As copper mining was discontinued in the mid-1900's, the railroad closed in 1973.


Time Line

1899. December 27. The line is completed from Greenland (on the MILW) 40.9 miles to Houghton (on the DSS&A). out of heavily timbered country and it was necessary to blast out stumps to clear the way for the graders. Track laying was begun Sept. 26 at the Houghton end of the line and five miles were completed that month. The rails, weighing 75 lbs. to the yard, were made by the Illinois Steel Co. at South Chicago. There was an average of 900 men and 300 teams at work all summer, and the last spike - appropriately made of copper - was driven December 26.

The contract of C. E. Loss & Co. included culverts and bridges with the exception of the bridge over the Fire Steel River, which is long, composed of three trestles each of 500 feet, and which cost $60,000. Of the other bridges, the largest, that at Cole's Creek Valley is 320 feet long and 85 feet high, and that [is] at the old Atlantic Stamp Mill 400 feet long and 75 feet high. It was intended to build these bridges of steel, cut the difficulty in getting material made it necessary to build them temporarily of timber.

The first passenger train was run on the road December 8 [1899] when service was opened from Houghton south 27 miles to Winona Mine, and with the completion of the road this service has now been extended over the entire line. The road is owned by the Copper Range Co., which controls the entire capital stock and $1 million of bonds of the road. It also owns outright 8,000 acres of land on the mineral range, and has under option 2,240 acres of land from the St. Mary's Canal Mineral Land Co. The road with its feeders, which are yet to be built, taps a very rich copper mining district. [RG-1900-0112] Standard gauge.

1901. January 6. A branch is built from Mill Mine Junction to Painesdale to reach the mining district there. Liners also extended to Baltic Mine, Freda, Redridge, Edgemere and Greenland. [MRL]

1901. The branch line from Mill Mine Junction to Freda along Lake Superior was constructed as part of the original Copper Range railroad. [MRL]

1902. SNAPSHOT. The road employs 172 people, including 2 train dispatchers, 11 station agents, 12 enginemen and firemen, 12 conductors,6 other trainmen, 54 section foremen and hands, 12 switchmen, 5 flagmen and watchmen, and 2 telegraph operators. The railroad crosses the Atlantic & Lake Superior at Atlantic and the Mineral Range railroad at Peppard. The road operated 13 locomotives, 9 8-wheel passenger cars, 2 express/baggage cars, 19 box freight cars, 100 platform cars, 128 ore cars 2 conductor way cars, and one steam shovel. All cars equipped with power brakes, Westinghouse and New York patterns. Passenger cars are headed with steam, Baker and Gold heaters. Top five categories of freight carried in tons:  copper rock (381,547 tons); coal (124,000 tons), forest products (46,000 tons), stone, sand (25,651 tons), and cement brick, lime (7,971 tons). The company used the United States Express Company, and the Western Union Telegraph Co. owned about 60 miles of telegraph line. [MCR-1903]

1902. October 6. Two trespassers were killed this year. "Engine No. 101 struck them before it could be stopped. Jug with whiskey found beside them. Jury exonerated railroad company". [MCR-1903]

1903. The main line is extended across Portage Lake and on to Calumet. [MRL]

1903. The COPR reports that it crosses the following railroads at grade: MR at Peppard; A&LS at Atlantic; MR on the Portage Lake bridge; H&C at Hancock (smelter); and the MR near Calumet. The COPR crosses over the Q&TL at Mason (3 different crossings); and under the MR Arcadian Branch at Montreal; under a spur of the Q&TL at Mason; under the H&C near Mills; under the H&TL at Lake Linden; and under the Houghton Street Railway near Calumet. [MCR-1904]

1904. March 19. The management of the Copper Range railroad have just ordered five new passenger coaches and two new combination cars for use on their line between the copper country  and the Marquette range towns during the coming summer. Many excursions are expected during the summer and the company wish to be prepared for this increase in their business. [BHN-1904-0319]

1904. June. The Copper Range railroad has placed an order with the American Car & Foundry Co. for 25 forty-ton ore cars. These will probably be built at the Detroit plant. The road has also ordered two new locomotives. [DFP-1904-0622]

1907 School Train. From 1907 to 1944, the Copper Range railroad operated a school train for the purpose of picking up and delivering students from the mining region to the Adams Township School in Painesdale. Most of the mines in the region south of Houghton were owned or operated by the Copper Range Company, the parent of the railroad and the road system between mining locations was inadequate especially given the snowfall during the winter months.

The train, with as many as six passenger cars, left the Houghton COPR yard heading south. At Atlantic Mine they dropped off a car for loading of students.

The train then headed around the wye at Mill Mine Jct. west to pick up students at Freda, which was had a Copper Range facility on Lake Superior. The train turned around at Beacon Hill, picking up students along the route at Redridge, Salmon Trout and other towns. Back at Atlantic Mine, the dripped off car was picked up (now full of students) and the train headed south to the school at Painsdale picking up students at Baltic, Trimountain and other locations.

In the afternoon, the trip was reversed and students were brought home. While school was in session, the locomotive crew switched the ore mines in the area and ore cars were often attached to the back of the train on the trip home. Copper Range Bus Co. busses began replacing the school train at some locations in 1941 and the service was discontinued in 1944. Stanton and Adams Townships reimbursed the railroad for the cost of the train and a coupon system was used by students when they road.

For a complete description of the train, see the September/October, 2020 edition of the Michigan History Magazine and the article by Jeremy W. Kilar on page 14. [MHM-10/2020]

1909. The line from McKeever to Mass City is removed. [MRL]

COPR-Advertisement1909MarkWorrallColl.jpg1910. July 19. Offices Move. The general offices of the Copper Range railroad in the Dee Building were this morning shifted from the rear to the front of the second floor of tht structure, taking possession of the suite recently vacated by Paine, Webber & Co. This suite of rooms occupies much of the front of the second floor of the building and has been entirely remodeled and redecorated for the railroad company. [ CN-1910-0719]

1910. October 3. Telephone replaces telegraph. The Copper Range railroad will substitute a telephone system for the former railroad ticker, and the Kellogg train dispatching system, which is being installed on that road, will be in operation by the first of next January (1911). This work of installing this system will require the reconstruction of the entire line, ad poles will be placed from the right to the left side of the tracks. The telephone, because of the great ease and facility of transmission, is rapidly supplanting the telegraph which has been considered the standard for handling train movements for a great many years.

There are several reasons why the telephone is better than the telegraph for railroad purposes, it is said. By the Kellogg system more privacy may be secured but at the same time, if necessary, all the agents on the road may be talked to at the same time. It is also necessary for a ticket agent to be an operator. Several trains on the Copper Range railroad will be supplied with telephones and in case a train should become stalled, connection with the line can easily be made by means of what is known as a fish-pole arrangement. [ CN-1910-1003]

1910. October 4. Copper Range rebuilding car shops. Work on the foundation of the new car shop to be built on the site of the one recently destroyed by fire, was begun yesterday by the Copper Range railroad company and will be rushed to completion. The foundation will e built by the railroad company and the contract for the remainder of the building will be let to a local contractor.

The new car shop, which will be a paint shop and carpenter shop combined, will be constructed of brick, steel and concrete, and is to be entirely fire proof. The dimensions of the paint shop are 24 by 147 feet, while the carpenter shop will be 36 by 105 feet. A steel frame will separate the two shops and a track will be run through each. The new buildings will be a big improvement over the old shops. The company will avoid another fire like the recent one, which entailed a loss of $4500 all of which, however, was covered by insurance. [ CN-1910-1004]

1912. January 30. Copper Range receives three cars which were rebuilt. The Copper Range railroad will place in commission Thursday between Calumet and Ontonagon, a train of new cars, or old ones which have been entirely rebuilt and which have just been received from the shops. The cars have been painted yellow, so as to conform with the color of the St. Paul cars. There is a new day coach, smoking car and a combination baggage and mail car. A feature of the new train is the Pintsch gas lighting system, by which a storage tank in each car will be filled with gas from storage tanks set up in the Calumet and Houghton yards. As soon as the new cars are placed in commission three others will be sent to the shops to be rebuilt. [CAN-1912-0130]

1913. November 19. Wires Cut by Strikers. The wires of the Copper Range railroad and the Western Union telegraph wires were cut at Ricedale and between Mill Mine Junction and South Range. In consequence, train service was delayed several hours. [DFP-1913-1119]

1913. The Painsdale branch is continued to a connection with the main line at Ricedale. This becomes the new main line and the old main line from Mill Mine Junction is removed. [MRL]

1913. November 21. Extension Ready December 1. Announcement was made today that the service over the new Painesdale extension will go into effect December 1. All tariffs and time cards have been changed to accord with the new route, beginning on that date. The extension is now completed, the track laid, and it could be used by trains under new construction conditions. But the prospect is for favorable ballasting weather up to December 1 and General Manager Bolles is giving Chief Engineer Batchelder that much leeway to order that the construction may be more nearly complete.

It is not unlikely that the ceremony of "driving the copper spike" to commemorate the most important construction undertaken by the road in several years, will be in a theory only. It is probable the weather conditions on December 1 will be unfavorable to such an outdoor demonstration of the Painesdale joy in being linked with the main line of the road. If the weather conditions permit there will be some such ceremony. [ CN-1913-11221]

1913. December 27. Union Leaders Put On Train. William Moyer, President of the Western Federation of Miners, and John Tanner, an organizer of the WFM were observed taking a street car from Hancock to Houghton, and then boarding a southbound Copper Range passenger train accompanied by three men who seemed to be guarding them. The train was bound for Chicago. Moyer's departure was unexpected and a Citizens Alliance professed ignorance of the incident and refused to discuss it. This was a turning point in a long strike by miners in the region which seemed to culminate in the Italian Hall Christmas party incident which killed 72 persons, mostly children. [HP -1913-1227]

1914. July 3. New Coal Dock. The Copper Range railroad is erecting on the dock of the Houghton County Electric Light company a coal trestle on concrete piers, which will be used in handling about two-thirds of the company's consumption of fuel. The remainder will be brought in by boat. It is expected the new trestle will be in operation in thirty days. [ CN-1914-0703]

1918. May 31. Women Hired. The Copper Range railroad in upper Michigan is hiring women station agents to take the places of men called to the colors (for the war effort). [LSF-1918-0531]

1928. The line from Freda to Freda Park is removed. [MRL]

1964. The branch from south of Lake Linden to Calumet is abandoned. [MRL]

1971. Mining Railway Being Removed. The rails of the Copper Range branch line between Mill Mine Junction and Freda, a milling town are being removed.  Freda once was the location of the Champion Copper Mill, which crushed all Champion Mine rock for more than half a century. The Copper Range Railroad is a subsidiary of the Copper Range Co., which owns the White Pine Mines in Ontonagon County. [Escanaba Daily News, September 4, 1971]

1973. The remainder of the line, from McKeever to Lake Linden is removed. [MRL]

 

 

 

Bibliography

The following sources are utilized in this website. [SOURCE-YEAR-MMDD-PG]:

  • [AAB| = All Aboard!, by Willis Dunbar, Eerdmans Publishing, Grand Rapids ©1969.
  • [AAN] = Alpena Argus newspaper.
  • [AARQJ] = American Association of Railroads Quiz Jr. pamphlet. © 1956
  • [AATHA] = Ann Arbor Railroad Technical and Historical Association newsletter "The Double A"
  • [AB] = Information provided at Michigan History Conference from Andrew Bailey, Port Huron, MI

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