Railroad: Cincinnati, Saginaw and Mackinaw railroad


Toledo, Saginaw & Mackinaw railroadCincinnati, Saginaw and Mackinaw Railroad → Grand Trunk Western railroad


Bought: Toledo, Saginaw & Mackinaw (Durand to Bay City) in 1889

Operated for 12 Years

Became: Grand Trunk Western in 1901

Reference: [MRRC]


Notes

This was the Grand Trunk Western's branch line from Durand to Bay City via Saginaw.


Time Line

1889. The bridge over the Saginaw River in Saginaw is built. 194 feet. [MCR-1890] Height 15' 8". Depth of water 20 feet. Swung by hand power. Bridge protected by semaphore. [MCR-1903]

1890. June 6. The news was announced today that the Chicago & Grand Trunk railroad company is soon to begin operating the Cincinnati, Saginaw & Mackinaw Railroad, which runs from Durand to West Bay City. This will give the GT an independent entrance into the valley. Heretofore, that road had a running agreement with the F& PM. [DFP-1890-0606] Standard gauge.

June 28, 1895. Mr. R. W. Cummings, Superintendent of the CS&M division of the Grand Trunk Railroad died at Saginaw, Mich. June 22, aged 32 years. [RG]

1902. SNAPSHOT. The directors of this line were from Saginaw (3), Alma (2), and Toledo (2, including H. W. Ashley). Many officers by this time were from Montreal. There were six stockholders, five from Michigan. The road crossed the PM at grade at Maple Street, Saginaw, at South Saginaw, at Mershons (belt line), and in Saginaw east side north of the river bridge. The road crossed the MCR at Emerson Street north of the river bridge, at Saginaw west side, in West Bay City at Hall and Lafayette streets. 10 of these were interlocked using US&S patterns. The railroad crossed 96 highways at grade and 11 were equipped with gates or flagmen. One was automatic. The railroad has 21 stations, and employed 6 engineers and firemen, 4 conductors, 6 brakemen, 1 baggagemen, 29 laborers and 11 yardmen. The railroad had 6 locomotives, 1 8-wheel passenger car, 1 express and baggage car, 27 box freight cars, 38 platform cars and 1 conductor way-car. The also had 1 derrick and 4 boarding cars. Passenger cars were heated with steam from the locomotive. Top five categories of freight hauled by a percentage of tonnage carried: forest products (28%), coal (21%), stone, sand (10%), merchandise (7%) and hay (5%).

Railroad: Cincinnati, Saginaw and Mackinaw railroad


Toledo, Saginaw & Mackinaw railroadCincinnati, Saginaw and Mackinaw Railroad → Grand Trunk Western railroad


Bought: Toledo, Saginaw & Mackinaw (Durand to Bay City) in 1889

Operated for 12 Years

Became: Grand Trunk Western in 1901

Reference: [MRRC]


Notes

This was the Grand Trunk Western's branch line from Durand to Bay City via Saginaw.


Time Line

1889. The bridge over the Saginaw River in Saginaw is built. 194 feet. [MCR-1890] Height 15' 8". Depth of water 20 feet. Swung by hand power. Bridge protected by semaphore. [MCR-1903]

1890. June 6. The news was announced today that the Chicago & Grand Trunk railroad company is soon to begin operating the Cincinnati, Saginaw & Mackinaw Railroad, which runs from Durand to West Bay City. This will give the GT an independent entrance into the valley. Heretofore, that road had a running agreement with the F& PM. [DFP-1890-0606] Standard gauge.

June 28, 1895. Mr. R. W. Cummings, Superintendent of the CS&M division of the Grand Trunk Railroad died at Saginaw, Mich. June 22, aged 32 years. [RG]

1902. SNAPSHOT. The directors of this line were from Saginaw (3), Alma (2), and Toledo (2, including H. W. Ashley). Many officers by this time were from Montreal. There were six stockholders, five from Michigan. The road crossed the PM at grade at Maple Street, Saginaw, at South Saginaw, at Mershons (belt line), and in Saginaw east side north of the river bridge. The road crossed the MCR at Emerson Street north of the river bridge, at Saginaw west side, in West Bay City at Hall and Lafayette streets. 10 of these were interlocked using US&S patterns. The railroad crossed 96 highways at grade and 11 were equipped with gates or flagmen. One was automatic. The railroad has 21 stations, and employed 6 engineers and firemen, 4 conductors, 6 brakemen, 1 baggagemen, 29 laborers and 11 yardmen. The railroad had 6 locomotives, 1 8-wheel passenger car, 1 express and baggage car, 27 box freight cars, 38 platform cars and 1 conductor way-car. The also had 1 derrick and 4 boarding cars. Passenger cars were heated with steam from the locomotive. Top five categories of freight hauled by a percentage of tonnage carried: forest products (28%), coal (21%), stone, sand (10%), merchandise (7%) and hay (5%).

Bibliography

The following sources are utilized in this website. [SOURCE-YEAR-MMDD-PG]:

  • [AAB| = All Aboard!, by Willis Dunbar, Eerdmans Publishing, Grand Rapids ©1969.
  • [AAN] = Alpena Argus newspaper.
  • [AARQJ] = American Association of Railroads Quiz Jr. pamphlet. © 1956
  • [AATHA] = Ann Arbor Railroad Technical and Historical Association newsletter "The Double A"
  • [AB] = Information provided at Michigan History Conference from Andrew Bailey, Port Huron, MI

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